Writing inspirations – Hyde Park Barracks, Sydney

Today’s writing inspiration is a photo I took of the Hyde Park Barracks in Sydney.

Hyde Park barracks, Sydney - now a museum and a World Heritage site.

Hyde Park barracks, Sydney – now a museum and a World Heritage site.

These barracks were designed by convict architect Francis Greenaway in 1818-19, originally as a place to house convicts. Since then they have also been a receiving depot for immigrants, an asylum, and law courts. And by imagining the lives of the people who used this building over nearly two centuries, we can be inspired with ideas and new thoughts.

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2014

Buy print edition from Fishpond

Buy from Fishpond

Click to buy from Fishpond.

Buy from Fishpond.

Click to buy from Fishpond

Buy from Fishpond

Writing inspirations – a city street seller in Sydney

Today’s writing inspiration – for NaNoWriMo entrants and for writers of all persuasions – is a photo I took of a fruiterer in Sydney.

Fruit stand at the seaward end of Hyde Park, Sydney.

Fruit stand at the seaward end of Hyde Park, Sydney.

You can find these stands all over the city – places to buy fresh fruit and a raft of other things. The proprietor is chatting with a customer. What stories do they hear, I wonder? What do they see of city life? Do they see its underside? Its business? All of it? Pause to think – to wonder – to be inspired.

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2014

Buy print edition from Fishpond

Buy from Fishpond

Click to buy from Fishpond.

Buy from Fishpond.

Click to buy from Fishpond

Buy from Fishpond

Writing inspirations – another golden age Deco moment

Today’s writing inspiration – for NaNoWriMo entrants and for writers of all persuasions – is another photo I took in Napier, New Zealand. The city was rebuilt in ‘art deco’ styles after a devastating 1931 earthquake. This is the ‘Dome’, formerly the ‘T&G’ building, of 1936.

Close-up of the former T&G Building (1936).

Close-up of the former T&G Building (1936).

Wellington architects Adkin and Mitchell produced something that harked forward to streamline themes – with those implicit undertones of the refined lifestyles and golden age Hollywood world of 1930s deco. Something to ponder; something to inspire.

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2014

Buy print edition from Fishpond

Buy from Fishpond

Click to buy from Fishpond.

Buy from Fishpond.

Click to buy from Fishpond

Buy from Fishpond

Writing inspirations – a wonderful deco-era hotel

Today’s writing inspiration – for NaNoWriMo entrants and for writers of all persuasions – is the Hollywood Hotel, a bar and performance venue on Foster Street in central Sydney.

Hollywood cinema, near the Sydney CBD.

Hollywood Hotel, near the Sydney CBD.

Long-time readers of this blog will know I am a tremendous fan of art deco. This has to be one of the better examples I have seen of a small deco building – finished, Sydney style, in masonry.

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2014

Buy print edition from Fishpond

Buy from Fishpond

Click to buy from Fishpond.

Buy from Fishpond.

Click to buy from Fishpond

Buy from Fishpond

Writing inspirations – the stories an old boat might tell

Today’s writing inspiration – for NaNoWriMo entrants and for writers of all persuasions – is a photo I took of an old boat in Sydney harbour.

A boat in Sydney harbour...

A boat in Sydney harbour…

The planking and paintwork says it all; and as writers we have to wonder who sailed on this boat over the years – what were their lives, their experiences, their hopes and their dreams? What are the stories that flow around this old boat?

A moment to ponder, to think, and to be inspired.

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2014

Buy print edition from Fishpond

Buy from Fishpond

Click to buy from Fishpond.

Buy from Fishpond.

Click to buy from Fishpond

Buy from Fishpond

Writing inspirations – big sky and big country

Today’s writing inspiration – for NaNoWriMo entrants and for writers of all persuasions – is a photo I took of one of New Zealand’s fabulous landscapes. Big sky. Empty road. A vastness that belies the true scale of these modest South Pacific lands.

Wright_EastWanaka2013

This is just east of Lake Wanaka, in high summer. I find it inspiring. Do you?

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2014

Click to buy from Fishpond.

Buy from Fishpond.

Click to buy from Fishpond

Buy from Fishpond

Click to buy e-book from Amazon

Buy e-book from Amazon

Essential writing skills: fifty-plus shades of character

It was Ernest Hemingway, reputedly, who insisted that fiction authors should not create ‘characters’ – they should create real people.

Ernest Hemingway (left) and Carlos Guiterrez, 1934. Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons.

Ernest Hemingway (left) and Carlos Guiterrez, 1934. Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons.

He didn’t mean use real people – oh, except a bit – but he did mean that novellists, playwrights and the rest shouldn’t assemble ‘characters’, Lego-fashion. They instead needed to portray the smooth and complex dimensionality of real people – who come, needless to say, in far more than fifty shades of grey.

That, of course, is far easier said than done. Real people are tricky; they can say one thing and mean or do another. They seldom present as all-good or all-bad. They have motives. They have ambitions. They learn. From all this the author has to derive not only a believeable character – but also their character arc, their development as an individual. This is what the novel will be all about, irrespective of genre or plot.

And do you think the challenge ends there? Nooooo. You see, writing is always linear; you can portray but one idea at a time, in a sequence. What’s more, the surface narrative is always going to be at least one step away from the deeper character. Writers have to learn not merely how to unpick the deeper character, but how to portray the deeper character through a linear sequence of carefully selected narrative events.

The obvious word that springs to mind about this point is ‘aaaargh!’ – but never fear. It’s do-able. Yes, it takes practise – but then, everything does. And the results are well worth it. For now – with more detail to follow – try this:

  1. Think ‘real’, not ‘constructed character’. What motivates your character?
  2. What are they looking for – is there motion to their nature? This could offer clues to the character arc.
  3. What story or event might best suit this character? Yes- that’s right. It’s best to start with a character and believeable character arc first. Then look for a story for them. And yes, I know that’s precisely the reverse of the way most people think.

More soon.

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2014

Buy print edition from Fishpond

Buy from Fishpond

Click to buy from Fishpond.

Buy from Fishpond.

Click to buy from Fishpond

Buy from Fishpond