Writing inspirations – Monet’s garden, for quiet contemplation

Today’s writing inspiration is Claude Monet’s garden in Giverny. I took this photo on a slightly dull day using real film – specifically, Fuji ASA 200 Supericolor. Apart from adding my copyright information, it’s unedited.

A photo I took of Giverny using 35mm Fujicolor Superia film, 100 asa, 1/125 at f.8. Monet wasn't an artist...he was a photographer.

A photo I took of Giverny using 35mm Fujicolor Superia film, 100 asa, 1/125 at f.8.

From it I can only conclude that Monet wasn’t a innovative artist who devoted his life to capturing the concept of light. He was a photographer. I found that garden inspiring; the interplay of colour and light mixing with a quietness that – even with the visitors trolling around it – lend itself to quiet contemplation.

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2014

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Writing inspirations – Hollywood-style magic from the golden age of deco

Today’s writing inspiration – for NaNoWriMo entrants and for writers of all persuasions – is a photo I took in Napier, New Zealand. The self-styled ‘art deco capital of the world’, and a place where architects consciously looked to Hollywood and the magic of the movies when re-building the city after a devastating earthquake in 1931.

Party time in Napier's main 'art deco' precinct, February 2014.

Party time in Napier’s main ‘art deco’ precinct, February 2014.

I took this during the annual Art Deco weekend in February 2014. It was a wonderful moment to be in a city that deliberately looks to the magic of the age of deco. Not deco as it was, but deco as we want it to be; art deco in which Clark Gable or  Ingrid Bergman might step out of the nearest doorway; art deco of the golden age of cinema. And that, I think, is inspiring for any writer.

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2014

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Essential writing skills: grammar – the writer’s playground

It was Winston Churchill, I believe, who once insisted that ending a sentence with a preposition was something up with which he would not put.

Wright_Typewriter2As any of us who have dragged through High School English know, grammar is often touted as the basic building block of writing. Which, in many ways, it is; you can’t write things that scan properly without it. It’s there for a reason.

The onus is on authors to get it right, though that doesn’t mean losing perspective. Grammar is a tool, not an end-goal. The so-called ‘grammar Nazis’ who nit-pick authors for any technical glitch that they can attribute to the writing don’t achieve much other than showing themselves up as small-minded.

It happens though. Some years ago a book reviewer – not someone writing the reader commentaries one gets on Amazon, but a journalist commissioned to prepare a discursive article about one of my books – took a ‘point off’ for my use of ‘impacted’ as a verb. I’d done it deliberately, and it’s correct to do so. ‘Impact’ began life in the early seventeenth century English as a transitive verb. It’s still such today, though it is more often used as a noun. A fact that gives due context to the remark – which was, of course, an attempt to put me in my place; simple bullying of a kind that, alas, happens quite often in this sort of book review. (‘I can’t write books myself but I will trawl your work for anything I can claim proves that you are incompetent and ignorant as a book author’).

So the point about grammar? Just like musical rules don’t constitute good music alone, grammar alone doesn’t constitute good writing. There has to be a dynamic to written style – something that isn’t contained in the grammar rules, but which exploits them, perhaps even bends them. Advertisers and journalists do it all the time – how often do you see sentences that start with a conjunction?

This doesn’t mean being ignorant of grammar. You have to know the rules in order to break them. But once you have them down pat you can play with them. For stylistic purposes, the rules to bend are typically those associated with words – like, don’t start a sentence with a conjunction.

Actually, judiciously, you can. It means finding a balance; bending the rules enough to be interesting, without being blatantly egregious. It’s a skill, but one that comes with enough practise in writing. It’s as much an essential skill as any other – giving your writing what, in due homage to Frank Zappa, I always call ‘writing eyebrows’.

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2014

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Writing inspirations – the glory of Notre Dame Cathedral

Today’s writing inspiration – for NaNoWriMo entrants and for writers of all persuasions – is Notre Dame Cathedral. I took this photo late in the day after Evensong had finished, hand-held, using Fuji ASA 200 Supericolor stock. I had to guess the exposure, as my light meter decided to break just at that instant. But it came out OK.

I took this photo by guesswork after my camera's light meter broke. I was using 200 asa Fujicolor film which I figured was going to be pretty forgiving - and so it turned out.

I took this photo by guesswork after my camera’s light meter broke.

Notre Dame is an inspiring place in so many ways, bringing together as it does such a fabulous blend of tradition, culture, history, fantastic architecture – and mythology, right there in the heart of a wonderful city, Paris.

Have you been to Notre Dame? And does it inspire you?

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2014

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Writing inspirations – Sydney harbour on a sunny Saturday

Today’s writing inspiration – for NaNoWriMo entrants as they plan for next month’s writing sprint and for writers of all persuasions – is a photo I took the other week of Sydney harbour on a sunny Saturday afternoon, filled with boats scurrying in all directions.

Sydney harbour on a sunny Saturday afternoon...

Sydney harbour on a sunny Saturday afternoon…

Sydney has to be one of the world’s great cities – certainly, with its bridge and Opera House, one of the most iconic. What we forget is that it is also a city of vibrant life, pivoting around Port Jackson with its 240 km of winding coastline.

Have you been to Sydney? And does it inspire you?

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2014

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Writing inspirations – Gandalf and friend in Wellington airport

Today’s writing inspiration – for NaNoWriMo entrants and for writers of all persuasions – is a photo I took last week in Wellington airport.

Gandalf and friend...

Gandalf and friend…

This sculpture, by Weta Workshop, is enormous. Effectively life size. And, though we all know Tolkien’s story, I think there’s a good deal there to inspire original tales of our own, if we step back and let our imaginations drift.

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2014

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Writing inspirations – sombre gravestones in a sudden sun

Today’s writing inspiration – for NaNoWriMo entrants and for writers of all persuasions – is a photo I took of headstones at Dovedale cemetery, near Nelson, New Zealand.

Headstones at Dovedale, 2013.

Headstones at Dovedale, 2013.

It was a patchy day. By the time I took this photo the light was fading – but it carried an electric glow that I tried to capture. There was a mood to it. Inspiring? I hope so.

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2014

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