Inspirations: summer in the middle of Middle Earth

We’re having a heatwave here in New Zealand. Ten days of settled, golden weather, like when I was a kid – and no, that’s not just nostalgia on my part. The climate has changed.

I thought I’d share a few pictures I took over the past few days of the city I live in. For some reason it’s been tagged ‘the middle of Middle Earth’ just now, though I suspect Tolkien never envisaged his world looking like this.

Oriental Bay - named after one of the original colony ships that arrived in 1840 and a popular walk for Wellingtonians today.
Oriental Bay – named after one of the original colony ships that arrived in 1840 and a popular walk for Wellingtonians today.
Karaka Bay - on the eastern side of the city where Port Nicholson opens out to the sea through a narrow channel.
Karaka Bay – on the eastern side of the city where Port Nicholson opens out to the sea through a narrow channel.
I don't know i there is a story here, but I am sure it's possible ot put one to it.
Crowds heading to the ‘Sevens’ rugby – really, more a chance to dress up and have fun than about the sport. Was the guy in front trying to swim upstream? And no, this is not tilt-shifted. It’s what came out of the camera.
Brick monastery on Mount Victoria with the sandy beach of Oriental Bay below. The sand was imported from Golden Bay, all 30,000 tons of it.
Brick monastery on Mount Victoria with the sandy beach of Oriental Bay below. The sand was imported from Golden Bay, all 30,000 tons of it.
A rather busy photo of the 'Bucket Fountain' in Cuba Street. Iconic since the 1970s.
A rather busy photo of the ‘Bucket Fountain’ in Cuba Street. Iconic since the 1970s.
Immortal words from Iris Guiver Wilkinson - journalist and author from the 1930s, better known as Robin Hyde, a woman whose personal story was as tragic as some of the tales she wrote. Part of the Wellington Writers' Walk.
Immortal words from Iris Guiver Wilkinson – journalist and author from the 1930s, better known as Robin Hyde, a woman whose personal story was as tragic as some of the tales she wrote. Part of the Wellington Writers’ Walk.

I find the place inspiring. Do you?

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2013

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5 thoughts on “Inspirations: summer in the middle of Middle Earth

  1. Great photos. I find all of New Zealand inspiring. No wonder my great-grandfather fell in love with the country and its peoples when he was there in the 1890s. Some day I hope to see it all in person.

    1. Thank you. Yes, there’s some amazing scenery here – not better, I think, than elsewhere around the world, but we seem to have a lot of different variations in a very small space, which is convenient. Wellington’s sprung ahead, too. When I first moved here it had a repute as a rather dull and grey city filled with public servants. Since then it’s been transformed, and the waterfront in particular (which is where your great grandfather would have disembarked, if he came through Wellington) has become a boulevard and park.

      1. According to my g-grandfather’s journal, they landed in Auckland and then took a steamer to Poverty Bay. He didn’t say where they docked but I’m assuming Gisborne, since that’s where he was assigned at first. During his stay he traveled around a good part of the North Island.

  2. Oh, man. That sky looks beautiful. Our sky has been cloudy here all week. Lots of rain, then lots of ice, then lots of snow…then it starts all over again! I’m counting down to the days when at least it’s just lots of rain. I’m definitely envious of your heat wave…especially each time the heat goes out in our house! Enjoy it while it lasts.

    1. Thank you – and I certainly will. It’s sunny again like that today – wasn’t meant to be. This is really unusual for us these days. In the past few years NZ’s climate has been reduced to waves of random weather fronts, no two days alike and it rains every weekend…

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