Podcasting instead of blogging

I haven’t posted much on this blog of late. Time presses, and the reality of blogging is that time put into it is time taken away from work I have to do to pay the bills. I can’t realistically sustain a weekly schedule just now.

Just to put that into perspective, right now I have (a) a major book soaking all the time I can throw at it, (b) a third edition of one of my earlier titles on a publisher deadline; (c) a regular gig writing for a lifestyle magazine, (d) a gig writing for a naval history website, (e) I am looking at ways of getting a large chunk of my back-list republished as new editions; and, finally (gasp, pant): (f) discussions for future titles, for which the ball is firmly in my court just now.

I also wonder whether blogging of itself is, well, a bit twentieth century. These days the platform of choice appears to be YouTube, where a fair number of channels are essentially running in the space that used to be filled by bloggers. Or maybe podcasting is the way to go?

I’ve looked into both. The issue is time – the prior work I’ve done with videos (including writing and producing a couple of mini-documentaries) tells me I won’t have time for You Tube in the near future. Podcasts are another matter. I’ve done a fair amount of radio work over the years, promoting my books. I like the medium. And I’ve been planning a podcast for a while – the issue, as always, is time. But it could be worth it.

Let me know if you’d like to follow me into that medium. What do you think?

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2023


33 thoughts on “Podcasting instead of blogging

  1. I’m a bit of a dinosaur, Matthew. I can take in a blog post in much less time than it would take to listen to even a short podcast. Basically you’d just finish up on a list of podcasts it would be nice to listen to, but do I have the time…

    Liked by 3 people

    1. True. I am actually wondering about doing both – deriving a podcast from a blog post. Not sure yet. The problem for me is time, and just now I don’t have a lot for the blog either – I had hoped to restart regular posting some time in January but as things stand it’s more likely to be second-quarter this year.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Hmm…as someone who’s now spending way too much time editing videos for Youtube, I do understand the lure of the podcast but… To be honest, I’m with Barryh on this one. I read fast, so I usually find podcasts annoyingly sloooooow. Plus I have to admit my hearing is deteriorating so unless the podcastee is very clear in his/her diction, I find a pure audio presentation uncomfortable.
    That said, younger people find podcasts handy because they can listen while doing the dishes, driving or doing some other physical activity. Perhaps you could publish a transcript of your podcasts once a month? For us Luddites. 😀

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I’m actually wondering about doing just that – in effect, taking a blog post and then producing a longer-form podcast from it. Not sure yet. One of the purposes of the podcast is also to showcase one of the other things I do, which is music. I spent an awful lot of time in my mis-spent youth learning it, and have never done much other than amass a synth collection and write some bits and pieces. One of the plans I have is to use my own music as intro, background and outro for the podcast. This has the benefit of being mine, thus no possible copyright issue (which can occur with some of the canned stuff).

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Oh you should use your own music! Creativity shouldn’t stop at the written word!
        Just one word of caution though, as soon as you start recording your blog post, you’ll discover that speaking it is very different to reading it silently to yourself.
        In some ways, reading it out loud will catch every single thing you didn’t notice in the silent version.
        I’ve only done a ‘reading’ once, and it forced me to change the /written/ version because the flow and the rhythm were not quite right, at least to me. I read very fast, but I still notice the lilt and flow of a piece, almost as if it were a piece of music. And things shouldn’t jar…unless they’re meant to. 😉
        Anyway, I think you’re ready for a new outlet so go for it. 😀

        Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s true – time is the commodity just now in short supply for me, too (which is why it’s taken over a week for me to respond to your comment!). I am still undecided as to how to proceed. One option is to use a blog post as a starter for a longer podcast and publish both.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I know a bunch of people who run successful YouTube channels. I’ve thought about making that switch, but after talking it over with some of my YouTuber friends, I came to the conclusion that I’m better off blogging. Blogging is more of a niche thing than it used to be, but the people I’m trying to connect with online are more of a niche group of people, too. On YouTube, I’d have to try to make content for a broader, more general audience.

    Do what feels right to you, of course. But basically what I’m saying is this: just because there’s a larger audience over on YouTube doesn’t necessarily mean that your audience is over on YouTube (or podcasts, or whatever other platform you’re thinking of switching to).

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks – and that’s true. One of the things I like about blogging is that the platform lends itself to nuanced long-form content, and the people who read it are those who enjoy such and who respond with nuanced thought. Good stuff and I very much enjoy both platform and interacting with the people I meet via the blog. It’s a far cry from the style of comments on YouTube, which are short, often vapid, and frequently abusive to the maker of the video.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I always have radio going, so I hardly ever watch videos and if there’s a podcast I’m really interested in, I have to fit it in around radio programs. Podcast + music works, but podcast + info program does not. And like the others who’ve commented, I can read a blog post quickly. I’ve read some advice to authors saying that blogs are better than social media now that so much of that has gone bad.
    On the other hand, there are only so many hours in a day. Good for you to be so busy with paying gigs!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks. I write professionally and have done for years – currently actually making a living out of it, though the gig-nature of the beast means that all income is a one-off, one way or another (as it were). That’s why the time is so short – when I have the work, I do it.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I love blogging and interacting with other bloggers. I’m a writer, and it makes the most sense to me to interact with people in that format. I do listen to podcasts occasionally, but I am more likely to pop on an audiobook if I can. And YouTube for me is really about occasionally looking up how to fix the knob that just snapped off my washing machine. But I do think that when it comes to interacting with readers, you have to put your energy into whatever brings you the most satisfaction. For me, that’s still blogging.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m still wondering about what to do. For me one of the appeals of blogging is the long-form nature, which makes it possible to be far more nuanced than the dozen-word comments that fire up so much trouble on Facebook, the Avian Platform, etc. And it’s great to have a reasoned and also nuanced discussion with thoughtful readers – again made possible by the nature of blogging as a platform. I am actually wondering about doing both, deriving podcasts from my blog posts. Not sure yet. I need a bit of time to sort it all out, which I don’t have at the moment.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. It’s great to hear that you have so much on your plate and are staying productive with your writing. While it’s understandable that time constraints may prevent you from regularly posting on your blog, there are other options to reach your audience and share your thoughts and work. It’s interesting that you are considering transitioning to YouTube or podcasting, both of which can offer unique opportunities to engage with your audience. Ultimately, finding a balance between your various commitments and what you enjoy most will be key in making the best decision for your content creation and distribution.

    Like

    1. What worries me about any political commentary is that any ironic comedy overstatement about events usually becomes tomorrow’s serious reality. Urgh. If you haven’t encountered it yet, check out ‘Whoops Apocalypse’. Not the movie, the original 6-part TV series. Quite likely on YouTube, possibly edited into one clump. It was made in 1982, primarily lampooning the Reagan administration, Thatcher’s neo-liberal Conservatives, and the renewal of the Cold War. Nothing about any government could ever be as chaotic and stupid as the (Brit) writers portrayed…. well, not as the future was seen back in 1982 anyway…

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Malcolm Kelly and I are “in talks” to do a podcast which will mostly be about WW2 history, and probably the South and SW Pacific. As for political commentary, I don’t know enough about the subject in any country to have anything useful to say beyond parroting what I read in my news feed.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. YouTube, social media etc. do seem to be the preferred route now for a lot of creatives. The thing for blogging with me is I enjoy it so much, that’s why I do it. Can’t see myself changing that approach, even if blogging becomes more of a quaint pastime (like letter writing).

    I did have a look at YouTube, though, but like you it’s a time issue. Video making is a pretty drawn out process if you want it to be good quality (like look at LEMMiNO’s channel – the mini-documentaries are masterful).

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Thanks! One option is to make things funny. History generally is, but the academy is usually so busy worrying about status that the joke gets lost. (For example – true story – the ultimate reserved Englishman was probably Henry Paget, 1st Earl of Angelsey, who was on his horse next to the Duke of Wellington at Waterloo in 1815 when he was hit in the knee by a canister shot. ‘By God, sir,’ Paget declared to Wellington, ‘I’ve lost my leg.’ To which Wellington replied, ‘By God, sir, so you have!’ You can’t make this stuff up.)

        Liked by 1 person

  8. I think you are wise to ponder the options
    And recently my yoga friend and I were talking and we both said how we wanted to get our YouTube channels going this year
    She is a full time teacher and mother and she just had not had time to get her idea going
    And I have not made YouTube a priority (yet) and so we both keep putting it off
    But we had to laugh because saying we wanted to start a YouTube channel sounded so trite and like someone saying they wanted to make a Facebook page (or not the same )’
    But it had me thinking about how we keep letting the idea simmer and enjoy other platforms
    And for you
    It sounds like you have a lot of big writing projects on the works and so maybe blogging (more writing) is less ideal and videos for YouTube (you talking?) could augment or complement all the writing?

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Hi Matthew, I always enjoy your blog posts, and am always impressed with your wide-ranging interests and knowledge in a variety of subjects. I only occasionally listen to podcasts but would certainly follow you into that medium. Likewise with YouTube, though I imagine that would take up even more of your time than blogging. As others have said, I’m happy for you that you have a long list of paying gigs to use up your time. Aside from those, whether you choose to blog or podcast or YouTube, my wish for you is that you do as much or as little as you find enjoyable and fulfilling. I will follow along and be happy to hear from you whether it’s once a week or once a year.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks. I am actually wondering about both, in which the podcast might well extrapolate further than the written content – the styles are quite different. Not soon. I’m flat out with everything else just now – but this means that whatever I come up with will be well thought through.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Just hearing on the news that Napier has been impacted by the wild weather over in NZ. Isn’t that where you and your family are? Is everything ok? Just a wee bit worried. 😦

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I am there periodically & have family and friends there. All are safe though the district will be without power for weeks and has been cut off. Many bridges down & huge infrastructure damage from flooding. The cyclone tail is currently lashing Wellington where I am. I had intended to head north to Napier for its annual art deco festival on Friday but can’t see that happening now. I found a Newshub video detailing the crisis: https://youtu.be/HQfKj9QHhvQ

      Liked by 1 person

        1. As I write this the answer’s ‘probably’. Communications still down & while my immediate family (my brother, his wife & kids) are OK but without power supply, I’ve had no response from one friend at all, and another friend’s elderly mother is out of contact – nobody can get an answer (I tried too). Phone systems are mostly down – looks like all but one of the cell networks collapsed soon after power went out & as yet nothing has been restored. I am blogging on this on the weekend.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. If we’ve learned anything in the last few years, it’s the critical importance of communications, yet somehow it’s still communications that fail first in an emergency. 😦 I remember during the Black Summer fires here on the east coast, so many small towns directly impacted by the fires had no way of calling for help.
            I don’t have the knowledge to suggest an answer but I do wonder about satellite backup?
            If a fire were to go through Warrandyte, we’d be stuck too because we no longer have a landline. 😦

            Liked by 1 person

            1. The problem they’ve had has been that the power went out & most of the cell towers lasted only as long as their backup batteries. They’ve deployed generators to some of them and I’ve managed to get in contact with family today. It’s definitely a weak point in the system – back in the old days of copper the phones were self-powered. Comms are still spotty, however. I have a long-standing friend up there who nobody has heard from since the floods began. Meanwhile there was a strong earthquake where I am, so all that NZ is now waiting for is the plague of locusts…

              Liked by 1 person

              1. Gah…don’t joke! You don’t want to encourage the Four Horsemen!
                I hope your friend turns up safe and sound.
                I think none of the authorities ever plan for real worst case scenarios. I suspect they look at ‘average’ disasters and plan for those. Unfortunately, the days of once-in-one-hundred-year disasters are gone. We’ll be lucky if we squeak by once a decade.
                Humanity has always lacked the ability for real, long term planning. :/

                Liked by 1 person

Comments are closed.