The obscure word of the week is sciapodous

This week’s obscure English word is sciapodous. It means someone who has big feet. You could say ‘Bigfoot is sciapodous’, but it might be redundant in that sense. In point of fact, many words with ‘pod’ in them could refer to feet, drawing from the ancient Greek ‘pod’, as in foot. Take ‘podobromhidrosis’, for example, … More The obscure word of the week is sciapodous

The obscure word of the week is griffonage

This week’s obscure English word is griffonage. It means messy handwriting. It’s actually a pretty good description of my handwriting, which has never been any good since a failed attempt by my primary school to force me into becoming a right-hander. Your challenge: write a sentence or two in the comments using this word. Copyright … More The obscure word of the week is griffonage

The obscure word of the week is doryphore

This week’s obscure English word is doryphore. It’s a neologism that apparently originated in the 1950s, and means a pedantic and persistent critic. As a writer, I discover I am being stalked by such people with distressing frequency. Your challenge: write a sentence or two in the comments using this word. Copyright © Matthew Wright … More The obscure word of the week is doryphore