Can we sell books with suggestive gibberish?

The other day I tried to buy a little smackerel of something from a fast food joint. When I went to close the deal the fellow behind the counter suddenly said “Wuddawuddabopbopbop.” Hilarity ensued.

Me: I’m sorry, I didn’t get that.
Goon: WUDDAWUDDABOPBOPBOP.
Me: Sorry, still don’t get it. Can you repeat it slowly, not louder?
Goon: WUD – DA – WUD – DA … (etc).

It turned out he was trying to sell me an add-on. The speed of the patter, I suspect, was part of the technique to get an unsuspecting customer to buy a delicious handful of whole unboned chicken, lovingly dropped through an industrial macerator, chemically bleached, mechanically reconstituted into bite-sized chunks with artificial flavour, wrapped in sawdust and MSG before being deep-fried, left for half an hour to go lukewarm, then served up in a grease-stained cardboard cup.

ClickhereandbuymybooksOK?

ClickhereandbuymybooksOK?

That led me to wonder whether I couldn’t get bookstores to do the same for books. You know – somebody picks up the latest best-seller and ends up being on-sold a couple of other titles. The trick is mangling the request so the hapless book buyer doesn’t know what they’re ending up with – they think they’ll be getting two sequels to Fifty Shades of Grey whereas they’ve just bought a pile of books by that guy Wright (for selection, click on the titles in the right hand column of this blog).

And this is where you come in. Drop me a comment with your take on just how a bookstore attendant might mangle things so as to slip in one of my titles (that column on the right) – or one of your own. Thoughts?

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2015

Announcing ‘Western Front – The New Zealand Division 1916-18′

My book Western Front – The New Zealand Division 1916-18  is being re-released this week – precisely a decade on from its original print publication – by Intruder Books. With an all-new cover.

Wright_Western Front_450pxThis was an important book for me, the first of three I wrote exploring the psychology of warfare through the lens of the First World War and the New Zealand experience.

A century on, we usually imagine the First World War in terms of its Western Front – portrayed as a grey, muddy world of trenches, wire, machine guns, whizz-bangs, artillery, and senseless death.

It was all these things. But the real question is why. Did it really happen because foolish generals knew nothing better? That they hoped that the enemy might run out of machine gun bullets before they ran out of men?

Nothing, of course, could be further from the truth – certainly as far as the New Zealand experience was concerned. And exploding some of the myths is what Western Front – The New Zealand Division 1916-18 is really about.

Review comments about the original issue included:

“An immensely readable story”
– Denis Welch, New Zealand Listener, 7 May 2005.

“Readers of this excellent book will thank God and hope that such a war will never come again…”
– Des Bell, Northern Advocate, 30 May 2005.

“This is an excellent read, factual, often emotional and simply written. It should appeal to all New Zealanders”
– Graeme Cass, Hawke’s Bay Today, 2 July 2005.

Western Front – The New Zealand Division 1916-18 is the second in a series of releases by Intruder Books, initially featuring the military books I wrote between 1998 and 2007. The first, Kiwi Air Power, is also available. And there’s more to come.

You can buy your copy right now, direct on Kindle – click on the cover.

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2015

Anticipating the next trend in book cover styles

I recently dug out some of the military histories I wrote in the late 1990s-early 2000s, largely because Intruder Books are reissuing some of them and I wanted to check out the old cover designs. Not to use those covers again – the license isn’t available – but to remind myself how they looked, way back when, and just how far styles have changed.

I commissioned the artwork for the cover of my 1998 book on the RNZAF. I still have the original painting. That meant I also had license to use it on the cover.

I commissioned the base artwork for the cover of my 1998 book on the RNZAF, which Reed NZ’s designer used as the basis for this cover. I still have the original painting.

A lot of that change, I think, flows from the way new technology provokes new styles. Actually, that was happening even before software oozed into the process.

Wright - Kiwi Air Power 200 px

Same book – 2015 cover. Click to buy. Go on, you know you want to…

Way back, sci-fi book covers were bright yellow and plain, in which case they were published by Victor Gollancz. Or they were traditional for the day – a cover painting (sometimes full colour), usually by Ed Emshwiller, with often hand-lettered title at the top and the author’s name at the bottom. Just like every other book on the planet, except that the sci-fi featured a spaceship or googly monster or something.

Then, around the turn of the 1970s, a young British artist named Chris Foss cut loose with an airbrush and a new concept – multi-faceted, amazingly detailed fantasy spaceships floating on abstract clouds. And he set a trend. As in: Bam! A Trend! Three milliseconds after Foss’s artwork adorned the Panther editions of Asimov’s Foundation ‘trilogy’ (it was in the 1970s), every sci-fi book cover on the planet suddenly featured fantastic, multi-faceted, hugely detailed spaceships floating against billowing backgrounds.

This book of mine was pretty hard to structure - took a lot of re-working via the 'shuffle the pages' technique - to get a lot of social linear concepts into a single readable thread.

Superb, superb design

For me, the best cover ever designed for any of my books remains the one Penguin commissioned from an Auckland designer for Guns and Utu. Just awesome. (Want a copy? Email me.)

Today’s covers are all Photoshop layer blend and SFX effects, which I can usually spot from about half the distance of Jupiter (I began working professionally with Photoshop in 1988…) Every cover on Amazon has a sameness which I just know has been done with Photoshop layer blends in various flavours. Sigh…

I’m determined this over-use of glow won’t happen for the New Zealand Military series I wrote from 1997 to 2009, half a dozen titles of which are due to be re-released by Intruder Books over the next two years. Layer clipping paths? Sure. But not glow. We’ll see.

Meanwhile, the next release is coming up in time for ANZAC day. Western Front: The New Zealand Division 1916-18. A tenth anniversary reissue, in fact. Watch this space.

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2015

History you can touch – now available in North America

New Zealand has a short history by world standards – the first humans to even reach these shores did not arrive until around 1280. But it is unquestionably an interesting past – particularly once we get into the so-called ‘historical’ period after 1840, when British and Maori came into collision.

St Alban's Church at Pauahatanui, near Wellington - site of a major pa in 1845.

St Alban’s Church at Pauahatanui, near Wellington – site of a major pa in 1845.

Open warfare flared between 1845 and the early 1870s, from Northland to the northern South Island. That is virtually yesterday by historical standards, and that makes those events a history we can touch. The more so because many of those events were not in remote bush locations – but in places we can see and touch. The Battle of Boulcott Farm, for instance, was in the middle of what is today suburban Lower Hutt. The bush pa of Titokowaru, Te Ngutu o te Manu, became the Hawera District Council camping ground. Really! The Battle of St John’s Wood, in Whanganui, became a supermarket. Gate Pa is, these days, a Tauranga bowling club lawn. Te Rangihaeata’s pa at Pauatahanui became a churchyard. And so it goes on.

The cover of my next book.

The cover – click to go to Amazon

It is a salutary reminder of the way history gets forgotten that these places – used daily by ordinary Kiwis – have such a dramatic past. And that’s why I made a point, in my latest book on the New Zealand Wars, of highlighting some of the easier places to get to. We should. History comes alive if we can visit the terrain – and history this recent should not be forgotten.

The New Zealand Wars – a brief history is my third book on the subject. And it’s been released this week, in print, for the North American market. Which I think is pretty cool.

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2015

‘Kiwi Air Power’ – out now, and it’s the best launch party e-v-a-h!

There ain’t nothing like the sound of a Rolls Royce Merlin thundering overhead as you sip your morning coffee.

I’m on my annual pilgrimage to the Art Deco weekend in Napier, New Zealand; a light-hearted nod to the styles of the 1930s and early 1940s. And its hardware. This was the age when Britain’s Supermarine Spitfire and the North American Mustang reigned supreme in Europe’s skies on the back of genius design, heroic pilots – and their Merlin power-plants.

This weekend, they’re supreme in my skies – flying over residential Napier doing aerobatics, which is super-cool. And from my perspective that’s apt, because this is the moment Intruder Books are re-releasing my original military aviation title, Kiwi Air Power.

Wright - Kiwi Air Power 450 pxKiwi Air Power was originally published in 1998, but it’s been out of print for fifteen years, and I’m delighted that Intruder have been able to bring it to a new audience. The main thrust of the book is the Second World War and its long-duration scion, the Cold War. And you can get Kiwi Air Power for Kindle right now. If you haven’t got a Kindle, you can get a Kindle reader for PC or whatever device you own, here.

Kiwi Air Power is the first of a series of re-releases from my military-historical back list, and the REAL launch party, the one you’ll all share, will happen when Intruder publish the second title from my back list. Watch this space.

As for the amazing Hollywood-style deco age fantasy I’m in the middle of? It’s still unfolding – watch this space, and check my Facebook author page for pictures – if you haven’t ‘liked’ already, the widget’s in the right hand column.

But enough from me. I’m back to the deco-age Hollywood magic. And that classic Merlin sound. Woah!

Catch you soon.

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2015

Kiwi Air Power: cover reveal and a sneak preview!

Here’s the cover of my book Kiwi Air Power, my history of New Zealand’s military aviation to the end of the Cold War, which is being republished as No. 1 in a new military series by Intruder Books.

Wright - Kiwi Air Power 450 pxYou can get Kiwi Air Power for Kindle right now – it’s being officially launched next week, but it’s already been released to trade and is for sale on Amazon if you want to buy ahead of the launch (sssh).

If you haven’t got a Kindle, you can get a Kindle reader for PC or whatever device you own, here.

The inspiration for the new edition cover is a photo I took last year as an RNZAF UH-1D Iroquois did some truly spectacular aerobatics over my head. Which sums up how I feel about this release. Kiwi Air Power was originally published in a case-bound edition by Reed NZ Ltd in 1998, but it’s been out of print for fifteen years. Now you can buy Kiwi Air Power on Kindle – and it’s the first release in a series that’s going to bring selected titles from my military-historical back-list to the market – and at reasonable prices – for the first time in years.

They’re also being published, initially, as e-books, meaning they’ll be available for readers anywhere in the world with a click. Reversing the old order of release embraces all the change that’s been sweeping the industry. And that’s super cool.

I’ve got other writing news soon, about my forward list, which isn’t military or non-fiction, and that is a return to my roots as a writer. Those roots are what made it possible for me to more easily find and infuse human truths into the non-fiction for which my academic work has been recognised.

Watch this space.

And on top of that, I figure when the next book in the New Zealand Military History series comes out – a re-release of my First World War title Western Front – I should throw an online party. What do you say?

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2015

Exciting writing news for 2015!

I have some exciting news.

Wright_Military History CoversFrom the mid-1990s through to 2009 I wrote 16 books on New Zealand’s military history, spanning the period from the ‘musket’ wars of the early nineteenth century, through the ‘New Zealand’ wars of the mid-nineteenth century, to the major campaigns of the First and Second World Wars, and some of the conflicts beyond.

They ran the gamut from standard campaign histories through to the development of the RNZAF, the story of New Zealand’s long involvement with sea power, the politics behind it, the adventures of POW escapers in the Second World War, and I wrote a psychological study of heroism. I looked into the wars as a social experience for the soldiers. I examined the ‘musket’ wars and New Zealand Wars from the perspective of sociological culture-collision. I also wrote a biography of New Zealand’s key commander in the Second World War, Lieutenant-General Sir Bernard Freyberg.

I wrote the lot on my own initiative, sold on merits to Penguin, Random House and Reed NZ Ltd, and funded exclusively through sales. Although I’d written principally for a commercial market, the scholarship I showed in these books was received at the Royal Military College in Sandhurst, with sufficient acclaim that I was nominated to be elected a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society at University College, London. And I was elected a Fellow, on the worth of my contribution to military history.

It is one of the highest accolades possible to get in history, anywhere in the world.

Most of my campaign histories – A Near-Run Affair, Desert Duel, and so on – were published by Reed NZ Ltd, New Zealand’s oldest and best known publisher, on the back of a multi-book contract they offered me in 2002. (This was unheard of in New Zealand, but they offered me one anyway).

Then in 2008, Reed were taken over by Pearson Group – Penguin. I had a close relationship with Penguin – they’d been publishing my social histories for a while. However, talk of reissuing my campaign histories as a Penguin omnibus edition fell through, and with the industry in general churn-over, my back-list – military and social histories alike – quietly fell into the out-of-print box. I began retrieving the licenses and seeing what I could do to have the highights of my back-list republished alongside my new titles. That led, among other things, to the reissue in 2014 of my Illustrated History of New Zealand in a fully re-written and revised edition by Bateman Publishing.

I also re-wrote and re-published one of my New Zealand Wars books for Libro International.

And now I’m pleased to announce another step. It’s taken some effort, but I’m delighted to say that at least seven, and possibly more, of my military campaign histories will be republished in 2015 and 2016.

heroesIt’s a true twenty-first century effort, embracing the e-book revolution and taking advantage of the way e-readers have exploded into life in the last few years. That means they can be bought with the click of a button – from anywhere in the world. Print will follow if demand warrants it.

The imprint is Intruder Press, and the first of my titles to be reissued is Kiwi Air Power, a history of the RNZAF originally published by Reed NZ Ltd in 1998. It’s been out of print for 15 years – and it’s going to be available in a few weeks. The second release will be my book on the New Zealand Division in the Western Front, in time for this year’s Anzac Day.

Watch this space for cover reveals and more details. Soon.

Copyright © Matthew Wright 2015