The obscure word of the week is steatopygous

This week’s obscure English word is steatopygous. It means having a large bottom. I’m not sure what use such a word actually has, but I guess if anybody feels they MUST describe their own backside dimensions at all, ‘steatopygous’ sounds much more sophisticated than possible alternatives. Probably. Your challenge: write a sentence or two in … More The obscure word of the week is steatopygous

The obscure word of the week is canorous

This week’s obscure English word is canorous. It’s a word deriving from the seventeenth century meaning ‘melodious’. I have to say it. ‘Bach’s canorous cantatas aren’t canned but the cantankerous choir can do the cancan.’ Your challenge: write a sentence or two in the comments – and maybe without my execrable alliteration – using this … More The obscure word of the week is canorous

The obscure word of the week is refulgent

This week’s obscure English word is refulgent. It’s a word used by Edward E. ‘Doc’ Smith in his 1930s deco-punk space operas. For instance, in Spacehounds of IPC he wrote: ‘from the bright liquid of the girdling moat there shot vertically upward a coruscantly refulgent band of intense yellow luminescence.’ The problem is that ‘coruscant’ … More The obscure word of the week is refulgent