Do adjectives and adverbs have a place in non-fiction writing?

Do adjectives and adverbs have a place in non-fiction writing? Maybe. Used properly, adjectives and their annoying relations, adverbs, render the mundane into something extraordinary – specifically because, if controlled, they evoke emotions in readers. Control is essential: use the wrong adjectives and you reduce the work to ‘telling’, whereas what you’re trying to do … More Do adjectives and adverbs have a place in non-fiction writing?

Weighing in on the ancient ‘I before E except after C’ rule

Back when I was at school English spelling was simple: I had to come before E, except after C. It was an iron-clad rule. No kid or their neighbour deigned to seize the moment by disagreeing. The usual forfeit was swift reinforcement, either via some heinous and weird punishment, by seismic kick to the keister, … More Weighing in on the ancient ‘I before E except after C’ rule

Essential writing skills: he said, she said – without adjectives

Have you ever tried writing dialogue without all the ‘he said’, ‘she said’ nonsense? It’s an effective technique, though it’s easy to say ‘do this’. Harder to master. Hemingway set the gold standard – half-page strings of dialogue, often without any directions at all as to the speaker– and it was usually clear as to who … More Essential writing skills: he said, she said – without adjectives

Essential writing skills: Weird Al is right to use a split infinitive

I couldn’t stop laughing at this week’s furore over Weird Al Yankovich supposedly having an ‘error’ in a song about grammar errors. Weird Al apparently included a split infinitive in the lyrics. Oh, the (apparent) irony. Social media went nuts. Well, I beg to differ. And so, I think, would Captain James T. Kirk. Gene Roddenberry … More Essential writing skills: Weird Al is right to use a split infinitive

Essential writing skills: harsh sentences for authors

I posted the other week on the importance of getting the rhythm right when writing sentences. And on the incompetence of my high school English teacher, but that’s another matter. Getting the rhythm right when you write is part of the essential framework of writing – it lends interest. You can draw the reader, sometimes, by … More Essential writing skills: harsh sentences for authors

Will simplifying English just annoy the grammar Nazis?

There was a suggestion in the Sydney Morning Herald the other week that English could happily be simplified – no more ‘its’ and ‘it’s’ confusion, no more malapropism involving their, there and they’re. The advent of self-pubbing, it seems, has brought with it a decline in the correct use of apostrophes – and, of course, … More Will simplifying English just annoy the grammar Nazis?